SERC Boards

MIT faculty, students, and staff from a wide range of fields are offering their skills and expertise to help develop a cross-cutting platform for the study and practice of social and ethical responsibilities of computing by serving as advisors and participants on SERC boards. Members are drawn from all 5 of MIT’s schools and represent 19 different departments, labs, and centers.

The SERC Advisory Board consists of 22 members and typically meets twice per semester with SERC leadership to review progress, discuss programmatic priorities, and recommend next steps.

  • Hal Abelson (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Marc Aidinoff (History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Judy Brewer (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory)
  • David Clark (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory)
  • Randy Davis (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Genevre Filiault (Committee on the Undergraduate Program)
  • D. Fox Harrell (Comparative Media Studies/Writing)
  • Sally Haslanger (Philosophy)
  • Stefanie Jegelka (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Jennifer Light (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Eden Medina (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Wanda Orlikowski (Sloan School of Management)
  • Milo Phillips-Brown (Philosophy)
  • Rebecca Saxe (Brain and Cognitive Sciences)
  • Kieran Setiya (Philosophy)
  • Susan Silbey (Anthropology)
  • Peter Szolovitz (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • T. L. Taylor (Comparative Media Studies/Writing)
  • Kate Trimble (Office of Experiential Learning)
  • Bernhardt Trout (Chemical Engineering)
  • Pam Walcott (Registrar’s Office)
  • Danny Weitzner (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory)

Members of the editorial board for the MIT Case Studies Series in Social and Ethical Responsibilities of Computing assist the series editors by suggesting topics and potential authors and by reviewing submissions, to ensure maximum pedagogical effectiveness of the new cases of undergraduate instruction across a range of courses. The editorial board consists of 55 members, drawn from faculty and senior researchers across MIT associated with the following departments, labs, and centers.

  • Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Anthropology
  • Biological Engineering
  • Comparative Media Studies/Writing
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
  • Urban Studies and Planning
  • Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • History
  • Institute for Data, Systems, and Society
  • Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems
  • Literature
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Media Lab
  • MIT Washington DC Office
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Program in Science, Technology, and Society
  • Sloan School of Management

SERC Dean’s Action Groups

Modeled on successful workshops organized by MIT’s Teaching and Learning Laboratory, the SERC Dean’s Action Groups bring together small cohorts of researchers from a variety of departments and fields of study to work together, discuss common research interests, and help create frameworks for incorporating ethics into computing and MIT education.

This group is focused on crafting original homework problems and in-class learning materials that advance students’ learning of core course material while foregrounding the social and ethical responsibilities of computing. Throughout the term, faculty members learn about one each other’s courses and aspirations to create grounded ethics content. Group discussions, ethics resources, and thoughtful multidisciplinary feedback help Action Group members begin to develop new materials to expand formal ethics education at MIT.

  • Dwai Banerjee (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Adam Berinsky (Political Science)
  • Fredo Durand (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Daniel Jackson (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Kimberle Koile (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Eden Medina (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Milo Phillips-Brown (Philosophy)
  • Arvind Satyanaran (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

Bringing together leading researchers from programs at the forefront of computing and policy, this group is providing extensive insight, targeted expertise, and new contextual frameworks to lead discussions about pressing policy issues.

  • Hal Abelson (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Kate Darling (Media Lab)
  • Gary Gensler (Sloan School of Management)
  • Chap Lawson (Political Science)
  • John Leonard (Mechanical Engineering)
  • Aleksander Madry (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Neha Narula (Media Lab)
  • Noelle Selin (Technology Policy Program)
  • Lily Tsai (Political Science)
  • Danny Weitzner (Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory)
  • Sarah Williams (Urban Studies and Planning)
  • Luis Videgaray (Sloan School of Management)

This group is focused on crafting original homework problems and in-class learning materials that advance students’ learning of core course material while foregrounding the social and ethical responsibilities of computing. Throughout the term, faculty members learn about one each other’s courses and aspirations to create grounded ethics content. Group discussions, ethics resources, and thoughtful multidisciplinary feedback help Action Group members begin to develop new materials to expand formal ethics education at MIT.

  • Jacob Andreas (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Hector Beltran (Anthropology)
  • Will Deringer (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Catherine D’Ignazio (Urban Studies and Planning)
  • In Song Kim (Political Science)
  • Devavrat Shah (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Armando Solar-Lezama (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Chamee Yang (Science, Technology, and Society)

As part of MIT’s commitment to combat racism and advance diversity, this group is working to craft a blueprint for a new campus-wide initiative to encompass coordinated curricula, research, and broader engagements.

  • Sandy Alexandre (Literature)
  • Bill Freeman (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Chakanetsa Mavhunga (Science, Technology, and Society)
  • Amy Moran-Thomas (Anthropology)
  • Aude Oliva (Quest for Intelligence)
  • Ronitt Rubinfeld (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Justin Steil (Urban Studies and Planning)
  • Collin Stultz (Institute for Medical Engineering and Sciences)
  • Jessika Trancik (Institute for Data, Systems, and Society)
  • Ariel White (Political Science)
  • Karen Zheng (Operations Research Center)